• The following grading policies will be followed regardless of Face-to-Face, Hybrid or Remote Instructional model. Grades will be posted regularly in Schoology.

    Holmes MS Family Learning & Grading Guide What does it mean to be an educated person truly prepared for higher education or the workforce? As educators attempting to prepare students for a very dynamic and rapidly 11 changing world, we recognize the necessity that students acquire much more than content knowledge. To thrive in the 21st Century, a much more dynamic set of skills and knowledge is required. Technology and scientific advancements continually change the landscape of the immediate future. In order for individuals to be confident, competent and ultimately successful, they must truly become life-long learners who are adaptive problem-solvers capable of working both independently or collaboratively.

    Developing Academic Competency, Habits of Work, and essential Non-academic Skills It is our belief that Academic Grades should be an accurate representation of a student’s content knowledge and skills as consistently measured against clearly established Scoring Criteria for student performance identified in each course and/or grade level. Academic grades are not to be part of a reward, motivation or behavioral contract system. Non-academic behaviors such as work habits, collaboration, communication, self-direction, and creativity are skills that will be measured and reported separately, and will replace what was formally known in D11 as Citizenship. These non-academic competencies are immensely important as they represent the skills and qualities that employers and colleges look for. By making this delineation between academic and non-academic competencies, we can more strategically support the academic and behavioral needs and skill development for each student as an individual. Simply stated: Student learning and development will be targeted and assessed in three basic areas: 1. Academic Competencies (content knowledge and skills), 2. Habits of Work (HOW – task completion, meeting due dates, attendance, and participation), and 3. Essential Non Academic Skill Sets (self-direction, collaboration, communication, and creativity). Each will be described in greater detail below.

    Grading Language and Scale Course Standards: Holmes Middle School course standards are derived from the Colorado Academic Standards set by the Colorado Department of Education. A course standard is a description of concepts or skills that can be achieved during a particular course; they represent the essential things students must know or be able to do in that course. Report cards communicate a student’s achievement level of assessed course standards. Learning Targets: Projects and daily lessons are built around learning targets, which are stepping- stones towards meeting course standards. Learning targets are discussed with students, so they have a clear picture of what they are learning through doing the work. Traditional Grades: The grading system that is historically most common in public education in the United States. Often generated by averaging the percentage correct on multiple pieces of work over a period of time. (A = 90=100%; B = 80-89%, C = 70-79%; D = 60-69%; F = 0-59%)

    Competency-based: Students are assessed against specific Scoring Criteria on a 4-Pt. Scale that is built from specific grade-level performance expectations for that course. At Holmes Middle School, these detailed student knowledge and skill expectations will be developed and housed in the Learning Management System called Schoology. This competency-based grading language and scale is comparable to the 4.0 scale which is used in many schools and colleges.

    0 = No Evidence. Does not meet the standard.

    1 = Beginning. Does not meet the standard.

    2 = Approaching the Standard

    3 = Meets the Standard

    4 = Exceeds the Standards 

    Competency-based Scoring Descriptions For each major assessment, teachers will develop Scoring Criteria or rubrics that make clear the criteria that a student will have to meet in order to receive a 2, 3 or 4. The chart on the next page describes the grading scale in more detail. Possible Variations: On many assessments, especially those that are less complex (e.g.: a quiz), only the grades 1, 2, 3 or 4 are possible. (On occasion, on assessments of crucial factual knowledge (e.g.: science lab safety), only grades 1, 2 or 3 may be possible.) On more complex assessments that include rubrics with multiple criteria for a standard, a grade between 3 and 4 is possible. The indicators within the rubric define the qualities a student’s work must have in order to earn a score between 3 and 4.

    On an assessment of a course standard, this means in addition to meeting the criteria for a 3…

    3.25: A student’s work meets about 25% of the Exceeds criteria.

    3.5: A student’s work meets about 50% of the Exceeds criteria.

    3.75: A student’s work meets about 75% of the Exceeds criteria.

    For overall grades, students may receive grades between 3 and 4, which means…

    3.25: Consistently or lately, the student’s work has met about 25% of the “Exceeds” criteria.

    3.5: Consistently or lately, the student’s work met about 50% of the “Exceeds” criteria.

    3.75: Consistently or lately, the student’s work has met about 75% of the “Exceeds” criteria.

     

    Score 

     Description  

    For an overall course grade on a report card this means…

    On a classroom assignment this means…

     0

    No Evidence. Has not yet begun to demonstrate any aspect of the standard.

    A student’s body of work has not yet begun to demonstrate any level of mastery of the standards assessed. This is not a passing grade.

     The student has not submitted the assignment, or the student’ work does not demonstrate any understanding of even beginning to accomplish the standard. This is not a passing grade.

     1

    Just Beginning. Does Not Meet the Standard

    A student’s body of work has not met the majority of the standards assessed. This is not a passing grade.

    A student's work does not demonstrate substantive progress towards meeting the standard or criteria of a given assessment by an established deadline. This may mean that a student has not met the majority of performance indicators or criteria for that assessment, or student has not made an attempt to meet criteria. This is not a passing grade

     2

     Approaching the Standard

    A student’s body of work has met a majority of the standards assessed, but has just partially met one or more of them. This is the lowest passing grade.

     A student's work demonstrates a substantive attempt to meet the standards of a given assessment by the established deadline, but needs more time to achieve competency and meet all the criteria for the assessment. This is the lowest passing grade.

     3

     Meets the Standard 

     The student has met (earned a 3) on each and every one of the course standards assessed during the quarter. This does not mean that a student has to pass each and every assessment, but his/her body of work demonstrates competency in each of the assessed standards. This is a soundly passing grade

    A student's work fundamentally and competently meets the standard being assessed. All of the criteria for Meets the Standard (e.g., in the Scoring Criteria rubric) are demonstrated in the work. This is a soundly passing grade.

     4

     Exceeds the Standard

     A student’s work has consistently and/or lately Exceeded the Standard in each and every course standard assessed up to that point. This is the highest grade possible, demonstrating significant skill beyond the standard. 

    The student’s work goes substantially above and beyond the course standards in quality and rigor. Sometimes, a student will have to opt to complete a particular task(s) or prompt(s), not required of all, in order to be eligible for an Exceeds. All of the criteria for Exceeds the Standard (e.g. in the Scoring Criteria rubric) are demonstrated in the work This is the highest grade possible, demonstrating significant skill beyond the standard.


    Scoring Criteria:
    A scoring matrix for each Course Standard that describes the specific student performance outcomes that must be demonstrated to earn a 1, 2, 3, or 4 for that specific academic skill or set of skills. An example of scoring criteria is provided below. The performance indicator on the left comes directly from the Colorado Academic Standards. The subsequent descriptors define the student performance necessary to earn a 1, 2, 3, or 4.  

    Performance Indicator

     0. No Evidence

     1. Beginning 

     2. Approaching

     3. Meets

     4. Exceeds

    Compare the major regions of the Earth and their major physical features and political boundaries using a variety of geographic tools.

    I cannot yet locate the major regions of the Earth and their major physical features and political boundaries. -ORI have not yet begun on this standard 

    I can locate the major regions of the Earth and their major physical features and political boundaries.

    I can describe the major regions of the Earth and their major physical features and political boundaries.

    I can compare the major regions of the Earth and their major physical features and political boundaries using a variety of geographic tools.

    I can analyze and evaluate connections among the major physical features and political boundaries of the Earth using a variety of geographic tools